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Tax Insider

Subscribe to our monthly tax newsletter and tax article library and receive news, tips and strategies guaranteed to minimise your tax bill

For everyone with an interest in responsible tax saving
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- Access to digital library of 1224 articles - Downloadable PDFs  
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- Access to digital library of 1224 articles - Downloadable PDFs - Plus print version delivered to your door every month
£247 / year
  • 14 day free trial
  • Up to date monthly tax saving tips
  • New tax strategies added every month (48 over the year)
  • No minimum tie-ins, cancel anytime

Tax Insider Library subscription benefits

We recently asked our subscribers what they love about the Tax Insider Library.

These are the top 7 reasons that they gave us:

Here are just some of the strategies our tax experts are sharing with subscribers this month

  • When considering the tricky matter of remuneration planning, there are two things to consider; the amount of remuneration, and what form it takes. 

    Chris Thorpe looks at what to watch out for with regard to paying employees and directors.

  • Despite the reduction in National Insurance contributions (NICs) in Spring Budget 2024, more employees are paying tax at higher rates on their earnings due to the freezing of tax thresholds. Some may find that any pay rise or bonus attracts additional tax and NICs such that the net pay increase is minimal.  

    Jennifer Adams looks at some alternatives to rewarding an employee with a pay rise or a bonus. 

  • In the Chancellor's recent budget, he announced an increase in the VAT registration threshold on 1 April 2024 from £85,000 per annum to £90,000 per annum. The deregistration threshold has also increased from £83,000 per annum to £88,000 per annum. These thresholds have remained frozen since 1 April 2017 and are among the highest worldwide with an average of £44,000 in the EU, therefore keeping many small businesses out of the ‘VAT club’.

    Andrew Needham looks at the effects of the increases in the VAT registration and deregistration thresholds. 

  • When HMRC talks of payrolling benefits and expenses (‘payrolling’), it refers to putting the taxable value through the payroll when the employee is paid, thereby avoiding declaring items on form P11D. The benefit is removed from the tax code, but a taxable non-payable value is processed in the payroll. 

    Ian Holloway worries whether employers, agents, accountants or bookkeepers will be ready to payroll benefits and expenses from April 2026.  

  • The UK government supports households with children by paying a childcare amount to the parents or guardians. 

    Moneeza Siddiqui looks at the system of childcare benefit and the possible tax charge associated with it. 

  • Mark McLaughlin looks at company purchases of own shares and warns not to become too focused on the more difficult rules for capital treatment. 

    A company purchase of its own shares from a shareholder is a popular ‘exit’ strategy when an individual shareholder is retiring, or a dissenting shareholder is departing.

  • The concept of the limited liability partnership (LLP) was introduced a little more than 20 years ago, and is governed by the Limited Liability Partnerships Act 2000. 

    Richard Curtis summarises the process and considerations when converting an ordinary partnership to a limited liability partnership. 

Our articles from May 2024

  • Attractive tax reliefs are available on contributions to a personal pension plan and to the plan itself, but the focus here is on the basic income tax implications when the saver wishes to draw money from that pension.  

    Richard Curtis looks at income tax implications of withdrawals from a personal pension plan.  

  • It is quite common for building projects to attract more than one rate of VAT on different elements of the development. 

    Andrew Needham looks at how businesses can simplify accounting using composite VAT rates when making supplies of different VAT rates, particularly in the construction industry. 

  • Share loss relief (SLR) applies to ‘qualifying shares’; shares to which income tax relief under the enterprise investment scheme (EIS) is ‘attributable’ are automatically qualifying shares.   

    Mark McLaughlin looks at the importance of making a will, and some inheritance tax and other implications of intestacy. 

  • Under the construction industry scheme (CIS), contractors and deemed contractors must withhold deductions from payments made to subcontractors who do not hold gross payment status (GPS), at either: 20% (the standard rate) or 30% (if the recipient is not registered for CIS or cannot be verified). 

    Kevin Read outlines the changes to the CIS rules in Finance Act 2024 and also looks at a recent tribunal case. 

  • Given this challenging economic environment, many employers are looking to see how they can help employees financially. Pay increases may not be an option, bearing in mind the additional tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs) implications for employers and employees.  

    Jennifer Adams considers various ways employers can help employees through the cost of living crisis.  

  • Accounts depreciation is not allowed within tax calculations; it’s too subjective, so instead of that capital allowances generally apply for tax purposes. These allowances have been in place for ‘wear and tear’ to plant and machinery since 1878, with a factory and mills allowance allowing for economic depreciation within a trading business.    

    Chris Thorpe looks at where we are with capital allowances. 

  • Businesses are generally obliged to pay at least the national minimum wage (NMW) to their workers. Most UK workers over compulsory school age who ordinarily work in the UK are entitled to be paid the NMW.

    Mark McLaughlin looks at the national minimum wage for householders, families, and family businesses.  

Our articles from April 2024

  • When considering making an investment, two of the main issues are a good return and an exit strategy. As well as the performance of the investment itself, how to hold it is another matter. Personal income tax rates and those on subsequent capital gains tax (CGT) on disposal, and potentially inheritance tax (IHT), may make holding something personally an unattractive option.  

    Chris Thorpe looks at which vehicle an investor should use. 

  • Unincorporated trading businesses are going through their biggest tax change for a generation, with the switch to a tax year basis of assessment replacing the ‘basis period’ system for 2024/25. The tax year 2023/24 is a transition year with special rules. Further change is now on the way. 

    Kevin Read explains why some trading businesses face a big decision. 

  • The exemption from capital gains tax (CGT) for a dwelling that is the taxpayer’s ‘only or main residence’ is an important one for homeowners. The value of the exemption means that some may be tempted to claim it on properties that may not clearly fall within its parameters. We must therefore look at what is meant by an only or main residence. 

    Richard Curtis considers the capital gains tax only or main residence exemption and the required ‘quality of occupation’. 

  • Usually, it's the supplier who issues a VAT invoice; but in some circumstances, the customer prepares the invoice instead and gives the supplier a copy. This system is called 'self-billing'.  Any business can use this procedure, so long as certain conditions are met.  

    Andrew Needham looks at the workings of the self-billing system and how it can be helpful for businesses. 

  • In April 2023, the National Will Register reported that 42% of adults in the UK had not made any provisions for their estate distribution in the event of death. 

    Moneeza Siddiqui looks at how will planning can help to reduce inheritance tax liabilities. 

  • The strict application of the rule for allowable expenses would require all expense payments to employees to be treated as employment income, leaving the employee to claim relief for the allowable part separately. In addition, an employer is required to notify HMRC of all expenses paid to an employee, even if the employee incurs the expense on the employer’s behalf.  

    Jennifer Adams reviews the current use of form P11D and asks - is the form finally no more?

  • No-one likes to think about their death, so it is perhaps understandable that many people put off drafting their will, and some die without having made a will. 

    Mark McLaughlin looks at the importance of making a will, and some inheritance tax and other implications of intestacy. 

For everyone with an interest in responsible tax saving
DIGITAL
- Access to digital library of 1224 articles - Downloadable PDFs  
£197 / year
DIGITAL & PRINT
- Access to digital library of 1224 articles - Downloadable PDFs - Plus print version delivered to your door every month
£247 / year
  • 14 day free trial
  • Up to date monthly tax saving tips
  • New tax strategies added every month (48 over the year)
  • No minimum tie-ins, cancel anytime
What our customers say about the Tax Insider Library...
I find your magazine very relevant and easy to read, which is handy given the present proliferation of tax law & business regulations. I would confirm that I am currently preparing a claim for a tax repayment in excess of £2,000 based on information set out in one of the tax articles purchased from you. MONEY WELL SPENT! Keep up the good work.
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~Dr Bennie Mallett, General Practitioner~
As a practising accountant and tax advisor it is important to keep up-to-date with the latest tax saving strategies and ideas that could save my clients tax. This is almost impossible to do given constantly changing legislation and the fact that there are so many specialist areas like personal taxation, VAT, international tax, property tax etc. The Tax Insider e-zine is easily read and it has brought together tax specialists who are experts in their own particular fields. From the first issue alone I was able to share two articles with my clients that have saved them a significant amount of tax! A wonderful publication which does indeed show you ‘How to beat the taxman and boost your profits!’ I wholeheartedly recommend this magazine to any other practitioner and any other individual who is keen to look at ways to pay less tax.
~Alistair Davidson, Chartered Accountant~
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For everyone with an interest in responsible tax saving
DIGITAL
- Access to digital library of 1224 articles - Downloadable PDFs  
£197 / year
DIGITAL & PRINT
- Access to digital library of 1224 articles - Downloadable PDFs - Plus print version delivered to your door every month
£247 / year
  • 14 day free trial
  • Up to date monthly tax saving tips
  • New tax strategies added every month (48 over the year)
  • No minimum tie-ins, cancel anytime