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Property Tax Insider Monthly Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly property tax newsletter and tax article library and receive news, tips and strategies guaranteed to minimise your property tax bill

For everyone interested in saving property tax, including landlords, property investors and accountants
DIGITAL
- Access to digital library of 727 articles - Downloadable PDFs  
£197 / year
DIGITAL & PRINT
- Access to digital library of 727 articles - Downloadable PDFs - Plus print version delivered to your door every month
£247 / year
  • 14 day free trial
  • Up to date monthly tax saving tips
  • New tax strategies added every month (48 over the year)
  • No minimum tie-ins, cancel anytime

Property Tax Insider subscription benefits

We recently asked our subscribers what they love about Property Tax Insider.

These are the top 7 reasons that they gave us:

Here are just some of the strategies our tax experts are sharing with subscribers this month

  • Most individuals who own a house assume (or at least hope) that principal private residence (PPR) relief from capital gains tax will be available when they dispose of the property. 
     
    Mark McLaughlin warns of difficulties potentially faced by individuals seeking capital gains tax private residence relief with little or no evidence that the property was occupied as their only or main residence. 

  • The government (HMRC) has become increasingly worried about the volume of small and medium-sized enterprise research and development (R&D) tax credit payments where a company claims to have undertaken eligible R&D activity (and it is important to keep in mind that only certain types of R&D may qualify – there are a lot of criteria).

    Lee Sharpe looks at tax aspects of modernising property and the risk of disallowance as improvements that constitute capital expenditure, losing income tax relief in the property business. 

  • Whether to buy commercial or residential property depends on various factors, not least the more beneficial tax system for commercial lets and whether an individual or a company is purchasing the property. The government wishes to encourage commercial lets and therefore permits a more generous tax regime than residential lettings. 

    Jennifer Adams considers some important tax benefits of investing in commercial property.

  • When it comes to letting residential property, not all property is equal in tax terms – lettings that qualify as ‘furnished holiday lettings’ (FHLs) benefit from special tax rules.  

    Sarah Bradford outlines the implications for landlords of the end of the furnished holiday lettings tax regime and asks if it is worth selling before 6 April 2025 to benefit from the existing capital gains tax reliefs. 

Property Tax Insider articles from May 2024

  • This article sets out to cover some useful tax pointers to consider in contemplation of property transfers. 
     
    Lee Sharpe considers some key tax aspects of property transfers. 

  • Every building has a life span - usually between 80 and 100 years. Older buildings require a considerable amount of maintenance, and there comes a point when repairs are not always cost-effective. 

    Jennifer Adams considers the tax implications of demolishing a residential property and rebuilding from scratch rather than just renovating.  

  • For capital gains tax (CGT) purposes, all gains are not equal. Higher rates of tax apply where the gain relates to residential property. There are also stricter reporting and payment deadlines. 

    Sarah Bradford examines the impact of the reduction in the higher rate of capital gains tax on residential property gains and the rules for reporting the gain and paying the tax. 

  • ‘Pre-owned assets tax’ (POAT) is an income tax charge (FA 2004, Sch 15), which was originally introduced to block certain inheritance tax (IHT) anti-avoidance arrangements. However, it can have unintended and unfortunate consequences in some cases. 

    Mark McLaughlin looks at pre-owned assets tax and the ‘occupation’ of land and buildings.

Property Tax Insider articles from April 2024

  • There are complications to the Form 17 procedure for married couples and civil partnerships. The regime applies only to legally married couples and civil partnerships, where the spouses, etc., are living together as a couple during the tax year (ITA 2007, ss 836, 837). 

    Lee Sharpe looks at some of the intricacies of Form 17 for spouses and civil partners.

  • Changes in the ways that unincorporated landlords receive relief for interest costs in relation to residential lettings have led to an increase in corporate landlords. There are some tax advantages:  interest and finance costs incurred in relation to residential lets are deductible in full in computing the property company’s profits for corporation tax purposes; and the highest rate of corporation tax at 25% is significantly lower than the highest rate of income tax at 45%. 
     
    Sarah Bradford explores how profits can be extracted from a property company for personal use in a tax-efficient manner.

  • Think back to 2013; David Cameron was still Prime Minister, HMV had collapsed, Andy Murray won Wimbledon, and HMRC announced the start of the let property campaign (LPC).  

    Jennifer Adams considers whether the ‘Let property campaign’ has been a success for HMRC and asks whether it will still be around ten years from now. 

  • For capital gains tax (CGT) purposes, in determining a gain (or loss) when an individual disposes of an asset such as a buy-to-let investment property, certain incidental costs can normally be deducted in calculating the taxable gain (or allowable loss), in addition to the cost of acquiring the property.  

    Mark McLaughlin looks at the deduction of costs for capital gains tax purposes on the disposal of an investment property by an individual. 

For everyone interested in saving property tax, including landlords, property investors and accountants
DIGITAL
- Access to digital library of 727 articles - Downloadable PDFs  
£197 / year
DIGITAL & PRINT
- Access to digital library of 727 articles - Downloadable PDFs - Plus print version delivered to your door every month
£247 / year
  • 14 day free trial
  • Up to date monthly tax saving tips
  • New tax strategies added every month (48 over the year)
  • No minimum tie-ins, cancel anytime
What our customers say about Property Tax Insider...
I hold a subscription to the newsletter because as a Landlord having the most up-to-date tax information is important to me and Tax Insider continues to have that. Continued use of my subscription to the Tax Insider magazines has helped me to make some savings which, without the service, I would not have been aware of.
~Raj Rana, Landlord~
I use Property Tax Insider as a medium to understand the various tax migration strategies which are available to me as a property investor, the various articles are useful to help me increase my breadth and understanding of different issues.
~Peter Wilkes, Landlord, Property Investor~
When we purchased the subscription to your newsletter we have previously been told by an unrelated party that Landlord solar panel income is tax-free, an article within the newsletter helped us to quickly understand that it isn’t and helped us to become fully legal and compliant. It has helped with planning for the future hugely.
~Diane Barnard, Landlord~
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For everyone interested in saving property tax, including landlords, property investors and accountants
DIGITAL
- Access to digital library of 727 articles - Downloadable PDFs  
£197 / year
DIGITAL & PRINT
- Access to digital library of 727 articles - Downloadable PDFs - Plus print version delivered to your door every month
£247 / year
  • 14 day free trial
  • Up to date monthly tax saving tips
  • New tax strategies added every month (48 over the year)
  • No minimum tie-ins, cancel anytime