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Tax Insider 3 x Newsletter Bundle 

Try all 3 of our monthly tax newsletters - Tax Insider, Property Tax Insider and Business Tax Insider - and receive news, tips and strategies guaranteed to minimise your tax bill.

Tax Insider
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  • 36 issues (180 articles each year)
  • Strategies ideal for anyone with an interest in responsible tax saving
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Here are just some of the strategies our tax experts are sharing with subscribers this month's Tax Insider

  • Liquidating a business - tax planning opportunities and pitfalls

    When a business or a limited company has run its course, for whatever reason, the owner needs to decide what happens to it; for example, the company will not automatically end when the owner dies.

    Chris Thorpe looks at liquidations and some related tax planning opportunities and pitfalls.

  • It's showtime! VAT and business entertainment

    The recovery of VAT on business entertainment is normally blocked by legislation. However, there are some circumstances when VAT recovery is permitted.

    Andrew Needham looks at the recovery of VAT on business entertainment.

  • How do employees get tax relief on pensions?

    Most individuals in the UK will be eligible for the state pension. This is a monthly amount payable to the individual once they reach pensionable age (currently 66 in the UK), at a level depending on the level of the
    National Insurance payments the individual has paid over their working life.

    Meg Saksida explains the mechanics and benefits of contributing to an occupational pension scheme.

  • When can HMRC ask for documents?

    The ability of HMRC’s ‘Connect’ database to identify links between businesses, shareholders, properties, families and across different government departments is increasing in its sophistication, such that investigations are being targeted, rather than being conducted on a
    speculative basis, as in the past. So, if a request for information is received, it is more than likely that HMRC has some information for which the taxpayer’s input or confirmation is required.

    Jennifer Adams outlines the powers that enable HMRC to obtain documents from the taxpayer and third parties.

  • Improve your company's cash flow and save more tax!

    Employer pension contributions are very tax-efficient. They will become even more so from April 2023, when corporation tax (CT) is increasing for companies with profits exceeding £50,000. For stand-alone companies, the marginal CT rate on profits between £50,000 and £250,000 will rise to 26.5% from the current flat rate of 19%, while for profits above £250,000, it will become 25%. 

    Kevin Read explains why owner-managed businesses may want to consider deferring directors’ pension contributions.

  • Investors’ relief: Business asset disposal relief's younger sibling!

    The 'helpful sidekick' of capital gains tax (CGT) business asset disposal relief (BADR, formerly entrepreneurs' relief), has been hiding in the wings for several years.

    Reshma Johar looks at an often-overlooked form of capital gains tax relief.

  • Cash is king – Or is it?

    Tax relief is available to individuals for contributions paid to a registered pension scheme, where certain conditions are satisfied. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) considers ‘paid’ generally means the contributions must be of a monetary amount, such as cash or bank transfer (NB: a possible exception applies for eligible shares relating to SAYE schemes or share incentive plans, which is not discussed here).

    Mark McLaughlin looks at pension scheme contributions and what constitutes a valid payment of pension contributions for tax purposes.

  • Q&As with Arthur Weller

 

Here are just some of the strategies our tax experts are sharing with subscribers this month's Business Tax Insider

  • Reducing NICs on business income

    National insurance contributions (NICs) are often overlooked in tax planning, but are a major source of income for the Government. Many regard NICs as being no more, effectively, than another tax. This point of view has a lot going for it.

    Alan Pink looks at ways that businesses can avoid overpaying National Insurance contributions to HMRC.

  • Is the cash basis worthwhile?

    Smaller unincorporated businesses can elect to compute their taxable profits using thecash basis rather than the traditional accruals basis. The cash basis is a much simpler method as it only takes account of cash in and cash out. However, it will not be for everyone.

    Sarah Bradford explains how the cash basis works and when, despite its simplicity, the accruals basis mighty be preferable.

  • Practical tax issues concerning loan notes.

    Many company sales involve part of the consideration being satisfied in the form of loan notes issued by the purchaser. The sale of owner-managed companies often involves part of the sale consideration being satisfied in the form of loan notes issued by the purchaser. In effect, the owner manager is agreeing to finance the deferral of part of their sale proceeds.

    Peter Rayney looks at some of the practical tax issues concerning loan notes.

  • IHT business property relief - anti-avoidance rule

    Business property relief (BPR) offers inheritance tax (IHT) relief of 100% or 50% on a transfer of value attributable to ‘relevant business property’. For example, unquoted company shares potentially qualify for 100% BPR, subject to certain general restrictions where the company’s activities consist wholly or mainly of dealing in stocks or shares, land or buildings, or making or holding  investments.

    Mark McLaughlin looks at an inheritance tax business property relief anti-avoidance rule that can result in a relief restriction.

  • Q&As with Arthur Weller

 

Here are just some of the strategies our tax experts are sharing with subscribers this month's Property Tax Insider

  • Corporation tax increases - should property company owners be worried?

    This article was prompted by one or two queries that have been raised by regular readers of the Tax Insider magazines. In it, we hope to allay most concerns in relation to property landlord companies, but also to highlight where those concerns may yet be valid, and what to look out for.

    Lee Sharpe looks at the effect of the re-introduction of a swathe of ‘old’ legislation to raise corporation tax revenues for a worried chancellorr for property investment companies in particular.

  • Tax relief for the costs of ‘doing up’ a property!

    Buying a property to renovate can be appealing for a number of reasons. For example, there is the possibility of making a profit from ‘doing it up’, as well as the chance to put your unique stamp on a property.

    Sarah Bradford considers the extent to which tax relief is available for the costs of renovating a property.

  • What are the benefits of selling a 'small' amount of land?

    Land is an asset that, unlike (say) an antique bureau or a painting, can be sold off in several tranches. Land is, therefore, a perfect asset for those times when a landowner is down on their luck and needs a little cash injection but doesn’t want to sell the whole of their asset.

    Meg Saksida outlines a potential deferral opportunity for capital gains tax purposes.

  • The tax position of forfeited property deposits

    Property transactions do not always go according to plan. For example, suppose a potential buyer pays the seller a deposit for a property. The purchaser has sufficient cash to pay the deposit but is subsequently forced to pull out of the deal as they were unable to obtain the necessary borrowings to meet the full purchase price.

    Mark McLaughlin looks at the tax position of forfeited deposits when property deals fall through.

  • Q&As with Arthur Weller

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As a business, we have a subscription to your newsletters because it addresses issues in the buy-to-let market and we can use the advice given in them to help clients with pre-incorporation guidelines on share structures. We find the articles extremely relevant to our work as a small practice in keeping us up to speed and very importantly providing no-nonsense clear advice
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I usually never feel compelled enough to ever write to a company to praise them for a first class product and service but for Tax Insider I have made an exception. I am an IFA and always looking to have good solid information to hand but rarely get the time to find it myself. Almost immediately, I knew these guys were experts in the field of Tax. Without hesitation, I subscribed to the yearly publication and was delighted to receive 6 free reports that were excellent (which I've since referred to when speaking to clients)! What a fabulous read, professional, informative with great features and tips. I never thought tax could be so interesting! I have even asked several free questions by visiting the website and should be featured in the publication itself, hopefully. Tax Insider is great value for money. Thank you!
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Tax Insider
Try all three of our tax newsletters today and receive instant online access OR 9 free print issues as part of your 14 day free trial.
Subscribe Now
14-day free trial. Cancel anytime.
Our offer to you includes:
  • Up to date monthly saving tips
  • 90 day money-back guarantee
  • No minimum tie-ins (cancel anytime)
  • 36 issues (180 articles each year)
  • Strategies ideal for anyone with an interest in responsible tax saving
Get all 3 of our monthly newsletters delivered in print to your door or as a digital downloads (or choose both):
Digital subscribers also receive our entire archive of 2129 articles!
Subscribe Now
14 day free trial. Cancel anytime.